Celebrating Family Caregivers - National Caregivers Month

Celebrating Family Caregivers - National Caregivers Month

Debbie turned the ringing alarm off. It was 6:00AM and time to get herself ready for the day. Her son would be there soon to help her shower and dress her husband, Jim. Her son came every day before work to help because Debbie, at 75 years old and suffering with arthritis, could not lift Jim out of bed or help him to the shower. This has been the daily routine since Jim’s stroke a year ago. When her son leaves for work, Debbie spends the day caring for Jim’s needs.

President Barack Obama, in his Presidential Proclamation of National Family Caregivers Month, 2011 states:

Across our country millions of family members, neighbors, and friends provide care and support for their loved ones during times of need. With profound compassion and selflessness, these caregivers sustain American men, women, and children at their most vulnerable moments, and through their devoted acts, they exemplify the best of the American spirit."

Statistics from the Administration On Aging show that the population 65 and older is expected to grow from its current 13% to 19% of the total population by 2030. With the older population increasing, the need for elder caregiving will continue to increase. Family caregivers play a vital role in filling these caregiving needs. Who better than family can understand the needs and ensure the best care of their loved ones.

Caregiving can be very stressful and demanding. In the case of a healthy spouse or a child living with the disabled person at home, caregiving can be a 24 hour, 7 day a week commitment. But even for the caregiver not living in the home, looking after a loved one or friend can consume all of the caregiver’s free time.

Surveys and studies consistently show that depression is a major problem with full-time informal caregivers. This is typically brought on by stress and fatigue as well as social isolation from family and friends. If allowed to go on too long, the caregiver can sometimes burn out and may end up needing long term care as well.

A typical pattern may unfold as follows:

    • 1 to 18 months - the caregiver is confident, has everything under control and is coping well. Other friends and family are lending support.

 

    • 20 to 36 months - the caregiver is taking medication to sleep and control mood swings. Outside help dwindles away and except for trips to the store or doctor, the caregiver has severed most social contacts. The caregiver feels along and helpless.

 

  • 38 to 50 months - The caregiver’s physical health is beginning to deteriorate. Lack of focus and sheer fatigue cloud judgment and the caregiver is often unable to make rational decisions or ask for help. It is often at this stage that family or friends intercede and find other solutions for care. This may include respite care, hiring home health aides or putting the disabled care recipient in a facility. Without intervention, the family caregiver may become a candidate for long term care as well.

Since most family members go into informal caregiving without training or counseling, they often aren’t aware of the possible outcome described above. It is therefore extremely important to seek counseling and to formulate a plan of action prior to making a caregiving commitment.

The Life Care Law Firm Association is a professional organization which consists of law firms throughout the country that help those family caregivers find and pay for extra help that keeps the loved one at home while maintaining the physical and mental health of the caregiving spouse or child. They do this by taking a comprehensive view of the situation, and not just focusing on the legal documents. That means they consider the care needs, the resources available, such as Connecticut Home Care Program for elders, Veterans Administration Aid and Attendance, and Medicaid. All these services go hand in hand to help the family caregiver provide the care needed to keep a loved one at home. A wise course of action for those giving care to loved ones is to seek sound advice on how to obtain additional help, so both the needy family member and the caretaker stay as healthy as possible.

Attorneys Stephen O. and Halley C. Allaire are partners in the law firm of Allaire Elder Law.
Attorneys Stephen O. and Halley C. Allaire are members of the National Academy of Elder Law. Attorneys, Inc.
Allaire Elder Law is a highly respected, and highly rated law firm with offices in Bristol, CT.
We can be contacted by phone at (860) 259-1500 or by email.

If you have a question, send a written note to us and we may use your question in a future column.

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